Turning the Page: Transgender issues — Moving on

I have been saying it for years:  For Transsexual folks who get SRS being part of the active Transgender Community can be a finite matter.  Being post-transsexual doesn’t require you to be a hateful asshole, it just means knowing the time has come to relinquish the activist role to others for whom issues are more immediate.

Better to back off than get angry and fight.  Better to admit apathy than go to war over words.

From The Montreal Gazette:  http://montrealgazette.com/life/transgender-issues-moving-on

Jillian Page, Montreal Gazette
December 10, 2014

Well, apparently I was wrong. Some transgender people do feel Chelsea Manning is a spokesperson for them.

And at least one of them threatened to campaign against me for daring to speak my opinion in a previous post, which I have taken offline not because of the individual’s intimidation tactics, but simply because I have decided not to write about transgender issues any more.

It’s something I have been thinking about recently. I started writing about trans issues, at the urging of my paper, when I was gender transitioning. I received a fair bit of criticism back then — in 2008 and 2009 — from other gender-transitioned women, who told me I shouldn’t be advocating for “cross-dressers” who will never have sexual reassignment surgery. That was my first inkling there was a great divide in the so-called transgender community. Indeed, those women didn’t see themselves as “transgender” people; they view themselves simply as women and they do not see “part-time crossdressers” with male anatomy as women.

But I did continue to write about transgender people, as well as other members of the LGBTQ community.

Lately, though, I have been saddened by the armchair social media militancy of some in the trans community, by how they pounce on and bully anyone — journalist or not, trans or not — who expresses contrary views. And label people whether they like it or not: when I mentioned recently that some biological women don’t like to be referred to as “cisgender,” a trans activist wrote to me and said, in essence, “Too bad. She must be a radfem. I’ll call her what I want.” (For the record: they are not radfems; they support trans people.)

Sadly, while some transgender people cry out for respect and equal rights, they don’t extend the same to others.

Not all trans people are militant, of course. Most aren’t. But journalists who have been attacked by transgender “warriors” are often very wary of trans subjects afterward.

Like most bloggers, I don’t get paid for writing posts. It’s not part of my job; it has been a labour of love. I will continue to write about some LGB issues, because I am part of that group. But I will step back from transgender matters, as so many of my gender-transitioned peers urged me to do in 2008 and 2009 after I had SRS. Like them, I do not consider myself to be a transgender person: I am simply a woman, and my path to womanhood is irrelevant. I am happy to live in the gender binary.

I will always be in favour of equality for those who dwell between the gender binary, but I will leave the advocacy to people who live that experience — because it is not my experience.

For me, it’s time to move on from transgenderism.

Good luck to all transgender people.

Cheers.

 

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